California Divorce | When You Need To Notarize Your Divorce

California Divorce | When You Need To Notarize Your Divorce

Today I want to talk to you about when you need a notary, when you need to notarize your divorce paperwork in California.

We specialize in divorce. We are a legal document preparation service in California. We are actually in Santa Clarita, which is in northern Los Angeles County. We specialize in divorce in California.

I want to talk to you about when you need to notarize your divorce documents. There appears to be a lot of confusion on this issue.

First we need to talk about the different types of divorce cases. So you’d understand what case you have, what style of divorce you have as you all know if this applies to you or not.

First off, we have what’s called a true default case.

A true default case is one where you file, your spouse does not file a response, they don’t participate, they don’t sign anything, they don’t cooperate, they are not involved at all. That’s what is called a true default case and you do not need to notarize your signature.

The court knows you file for divorce, they noted that’s who you are and when you submit your judgment you do not need to notarize your documents.

The next style of divorce is what’s called a uncontested divorce. This is where you have filed for a divorce, your spouse has responded and you’re going to enter into an agreement or go to court or something along those lines.

Those types of cases when you enter your judgment, again, you do not need to have your signature notarized, either one of you.

The third style is what we call a hybrid. It’s also referred to as a default with agreement. This is the case where you’re going to file for divorce, your spouse is not going to respond officially and they’re going to enter into a written agreement with you.

You’re going to sign, you’re going to give out disclosures, you’re going to enter into a written agreement, sign the judgment.

On this particular style of case, you will need to have the respondents signature on the judgment only notarized prior to submitting it to the court.

The reason for this is, because the respondent never actually filed a response. The court wants to make sure it is actually them involved in the case and not some other third party.

If you want more information on these different types of cases, they all end in divorce. It really just depends on if your spouse has responded, not responded, or if you are entering into a written agreement. They all end up with divorce. It’s just the type of paperwork that required for each of those different types.

We generally will use the default with agreement or hybrid case. This allows you to enter into a written agreement with your spouse without having to file a response and the benefit to that is you save money by not having to pay that filing fee.

If you want more information on that, stay on this channel and search for true default divorce in California or true default vs. hybrid and we’ve done a video on that as well and get more information about the benefits of that.

If you need assistance with your divorce, we can either begin and start to finish your case so we can pick up where you got stuck and left off. Let us know, that’s what we specialize in.

My name is Tim Blankenship with divorce661.com.

For more information you can to the website or feel free to give me a call at 661-281-0266.

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